Down Syndrome – Five Things You Should Know About Down Syndrome and Sexuality

You may be surprised to find an article on Down syndrome and sexuality as few doctors bring this up and it is not often included in the typical prognosis and diagnosis of Down syndrome. You shouldn’t be surprised, however.

Common perceptions are that people with disabilities do not have either interest or ability for the adult relationships the rest of us take for granted. This is, however, completely false.

People with Down syndrome go through puberty just like everyone else, and they have the same feelings and desires as everyone else. This is nothing to be afraid of, however. With a little education tailored to their particular needs, adults with Down syndrome can learn to be smart about their sexuality and learn how to minimize the risk of dangerous situations.

1. Sexuality is a Part of Everyone’s Life

When we talk about sexuality and Down syndrome, we are not just talking about teenagers and adults. All humans go through many different stages of sexual development, starting when they are babies.

The first stage is to develop emotional bonds with parents and family members. School age kids deal with the beginnings of modesty and the desire for privacy. Of course, adolescents enter puberty and start feeling sexual desire. It is nothing to be ashamed of, but proper education needs to be given to teenagers with Down syndrome to make sure they know how to handle these feelings in an appropriate way.

2. The Decline of Institutionalization Led to More Opportunities for People with Down Syndrome

Up until the 1960s and 1970s, people with Down syndrome were most often institutionalized in single sex buildings, and did not have much opportunity to interact with the opposite sex at all. Now, people with Down syndrome have independence and opportunities available to them, and it only follows that they should also want what is available to all other members of society – the right to develop and pursue meaningful relationships.

3. Additional Difficulties Exist for People with Down Syndrome in Relation to Sexuality

There are, of course, added difficulties when we talk about people with Down syndrome and sexuality. It is probably obvious that there is a lot more prejudice towards people with Down syndrome who engage in sexual behavior.

Parents have a lot more anxiety about it, too. There is good reason for this anxiety, unfortunately. People with Down syndrome have cognitive deficits that make them more likely to be a victim to sexual abuse, unwanted pregnancies, or sexually transmitted diseases. Women especially are vulnerable to issues of abuse and exploitation. They may not know the difference between “good touch” and “bad touch”. They may not know how to say no if something is making them uncomfortable. They may be lonely and willing to put up with inappropriate behavior in order to get attention.

The isolation and issues with communication that many with Down syndrome face may make it harder for them to access sources of support that will help them make decisions that are right for them.

4. There Are Ways to Prevent Exploitation and Abuse

The best way to help young people with Down syndrome be smart about their sexuality is to start educating them when they are still young. Sexual education for kids with Down syndrome should start in junior high, and should focus on personal safety.

Kids should be taught the difference between good touch and bad touch, and how to “just say no” to advances or touching they don’t want. A concept called “Circles” can be used for older or more cognitively advanced kids. Circles represent different levels of personal relationship and intimacy. Students learn what the appropriate touching behaviors are for each level. They then learn that sometimes a friend might want to be closer than they want, in which case they have to tell them very clearly “STOP.”

Sex education should be individualized for each student with Down syndrome depending on their ability to understand the material. It is important, however, to cover all the things that would normally be covered in sex ed, because chances are, teenagers with Down syndrome will need to know these things sooner rather than later, in order to keep themselves safe.

The more you talk openly and honestly with your Down syndrome teenager or young adult about sexuality, the safer they will be. The more they understand, the better you will both feel about this aspect of their lives.

Dating is also something that teenagers with Down syndrome will often want to try out for themselves. There are certain social skills required to be able to date, and these skills can be taught if needed.